Considering cellulose insulation for your home or place of business?

Cellulose insulation is 75% recycled material and 15% boric treatment. It has an R-value of 3.5 per inch of thickness. It is installed with a blower into the attics and walls of a home or business.

Because it is blown into place, much like spray foam, it fills small corners and curves in the envelope of your home that fiberglass batts might miss.

Ask the team at Reeves Insulation if cellulose insulation is a good choice for your building. Use our online form here: https://www.reevesinsulationllc.com/contact/. Or call us at (870)793-2623.

What makes it different from other insulation materials?

Cellulose insulation is a great choice for builders looking for an economical, eco-friendly option for insulation. The recycled materials are often paper, sawdust, or plant based materials. With this boric treatment, many materials that would otherwise end up in a landfill, get put back to use as energy-saving insulation.

Compared to fiberglass insulation batts, cellulose has a higher, more-efficient R-value. Air has a more difficult time moving through cellulose. Although, it is not as good at air resistance as spray foam insulation. It’s properties, once installed, make it a better air sealant than fiberglass.

Is cellulose insulation right for my building?

There are a few things to consider before deciding that cellulose insulation is right for your build.

  • Settling: Cellulose is designed to settle. This settling will not cause the R-value to decrease, the insulation will still keep your building at a comfortable temperature like any other insulation material. When it is installed with a blower, the cellulose insulation is damp. This allows it to cling to the right surfaces. It will dry through the drywall.
  • Moisture: When homeowners hear that cellulose is installed with moisture, it creates some well-intended concern. Isn’t insulation meant to be moisture-proof to prevent mold? Cellulose can recover from being exposed to moisture as well as the wood your home is built with and the plumbing materials running through your home. It’s properties also keep critters and unwanted animals away.
  • Fire: There is a very common experiment done to demonstrate how cellulose reacts to high temperatures. A handful of cellulose is enough to protect someone’s hand from being burned, even while a penny is heated with a blowtorch to the point of warping on top. The material might be recycled paper, but the borates that it is treated with make it a class 1 fire retardant.