Understanding Fiberglass Insulation

Understanding Fiberglass Insulation

Fiberglass is one of the most inexpensive and common insulation choices available. It’s almost always used in new construction unless the home is a custom build for a specific customer.   While fiberglass doesn’t have the benefits of other insulation options like cellulose or spray foam, it can be a very economical solution to problems with retaining your heat and cold air.   Do you have fiberglass insulation in your home, and you’re considering upgrading? Here’s what you need to know to make the best decision for your situation!   Installing Batt Fiberglass Insulation Fiberglass insulation is installed in sheets called “batts,” which are placed between studs behind the wall. They are inexpensive and simple to use, but they can easily be installed incorrectly.   In order to properly insulate your home, fiberglass has to have six points of contact with the cavity, sheathing, and drywall. They have to be cut to fit around electrical boxes, wires, and pipes.   Many DIYers install fiberglass incorrectly, by not filling the cavity fully or by compressing the batting. That’s why it’s vital to have a professional install this insulation if you plan to use it. If errors are made in installation, you won’t get the performance you need from this product.   R-Values of Fiberglass Of all of the three insulation options – fiberglass, cellulose, and foam – fiberglass has the lowest R-value. There are different types of fiberglass that can help you achieve slightly better results, but you’re still not going to get the performance of cellulose or foam.   This is why many homeowners decide to retrofit their homes...
Is Fiberglass Insulation Safe, Or Should I Use An Alternative?

Is Fiberglass Insulation Safe, Or Should I Use An Alternative?

Could your homes cooling efficiency use a boost? Depending on how old your home is you may need to update your insulation. When insulating your home you have several popular options to choose from, but one of the longest and most widely used options is fiberglass insulation.     What is fiberglass insulation?   Fiberglass is a tried and true method for insulating your home. Even though the technique of spinning glass particles together dates all the back to the Egyptian days, fiberglass as we know it originated in the 1930’s. A scientist discovered it by accident when an experiment went wrong resulting in a glass block being melted and blown into long glass strands.   He began developing and improving this process and by the 1950’s, had a partnership with Chevrolet to use his fiberglass in their car bodies.   Fiberglas is essentially small glass particles woven together. It usually comes in sheets with a backing on one side, but can come as loose particles to be blown into space as well.   Fiberglass works by trapping air and retarding the advance of moisture, heat, and cold. The effectiveness is based on the thickness of the fiberglass commonly referred to as r-value     Pros of using fiberglass insulation   Fiberglass is very efficient at stopping or retarding heat, cold and moisture. It can increase the energy efficiency of your home by as much as 40 percent.     Hazards and other cons of using fiberglass insulation   Not everyone agrees on all the hazards of fiberglass but there is a potential for health concern when installing, or...
What You Need to Know About Insulation

What You Need to Know About Insulation

While most people don’t give much thought to what’s in their attic or behind their walls, proper insulation is key when it comes to having a comfortable home, lowering energy usage, and preventing moisture problems. The Role of Insulation There are three types of heat flow mechanisms: conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the way heat travels through materials. Convection is the way heat circulates in liquid and gases. And radiation travels in a straight line and heats anything solid in its path. According to the Department of Energy (energy.gov), heat flows from warmer to cooler until there is no longer a temperature difference, regardless of the mechanism. So in the summer, it keeps the warm air outside, and in the winter, it keeps the warm air inside. It does this by trapping pockets of air which slows down the heat flow process. How It’s Rated Insulation is rated by the measurement of resistance the material has to heat transfer, also known as R-value. The higher the R-value the more effective the insulation is. The installation greatly affects the R-value of the material. If installed poorly, this can cut the value substantially. For example, you can install R-30 fiberglass batts but if the batts are not installed perfectly flush with the attic floor, it can cut down to less than half. The reason is because there are gaps between the insulation and the attic floor, which can cause convection heat in those gaps. That heat then turns into radiation heat from the attic floor to inside the home. For more information about R-Value, visit us here. Types of Insulation...