Benefits of Removing Old Attic Insulation

Nowadays, it seems as though everyone is looking for ways to save money, including on their monthly energy bills. One way to save money is by making sure that your home is insulated. The insulation in your attic helps to provide a critical barrier to the transfer of heat. While many people are aware of the important role that insulation plays in their home, what they may not realize is that the insulation in your attic may settle and become less effective over time. Keep reading to learn more about the reasons for removing old attic insulation, as well as the benefits of removing the insulation.  What are the Reasons for Removing Old Attic Insulation? Some of the most common reasons for removing old attic insulation from your home include the following:  Mold  If your attic, crawl space, or rim joist have moisture issues, so does the insulation in those areas. Traditional insulation retains moisture, allowing mold to grow and spread to the parts of the home where it is installed. Moldy attic insulation can result from a variety of factors that are more likely to occur over time, including improper venting, humid climates, extreme storms, and leaks from the heating and cooling systems.  If mold has made its way into your attic insulation, it is crucial that you remove the insulation. Mold exposure can pose many health risks in humans, including chronic coughing, sneezing, irritations to the eyes, mucous membranes, nose and throat, as well as rashes, chronic fatigue, and persistent headaches. If you have moly insulation in your attic, it is essential that you get it removed...

Cellulose Insulation: A Green Alternative

If you’re looking to move toward a more earth-friendly lifestyle, you have probably heard that insulating your residence can conserve energy while you’re at it. When most people think of insulation, they typically think of the big pink batts of insulation. But did you know that insulation can be green, as in earth-friendly, too? One popular eco-friendly type of insulation is cellulose insulation. Keep reading to learn more about what cellulose insulation is, as well as the pros and cons of cellulose insulation.  What is Cellulose Insulation? Cellulose insulation is a fiber insulation material that is made from 75 to 85 percent ground-up recycled paper or denim. These small particles form an insulation material that conforms to most spaces without disturbing the finish or structure. It is heavily treated (around 15% by volume) with ammonium sulfate, borax, or boric acid; this helps to make the insulation flame retardant and helps to reduce any issues with pests. Cellulose insulation is commonly used in enclosed existing walls, open new walls, and unfinished attic floors.    There are three types of cellulose insulation:  Loose-Fill Cellulose This type of cellulose insulation is the easiest to install, as it can be blown into attic cavities and floors using the help of a blowing machine.    Dense Pack Cellulose This is most commonly used for adding retrofit insulation. Dense packing into the wall cavities helps to add thermal insulation, as well as provide some level of soundproofing.    Wet-Applied Spray Cellulose During the application process, water is added to the cellulose insulation. The material has the same thermal as sound retardant properties as dense packing....

Where Can Cellulose Insulation be Used?

If you are considering upgrading the insulation in your home before the cold winter months hit, you are probably looking through all of your options, such as fiberglass, spray foam, and cellulose insulation. Because of the many attractive benefits of cellulose insulation, such as reduced noise transmission and long-term savings on your energy bills, it has remained a popular insulation choice since the 1950’s. Cellulose insulation is a great investment that will keep your home energy efficient and eco-friendly. Keep reading to gain a better understanding of cellulose insulation and determine if it is the right insulation choice for your home. What is Cellulose Insulation? Cellulose insulation is a fiber insulation material that is made from 75 to 85 percent ground-up recycled paper or denim. These small particles form together to create an insulation material that conforms to most spaces without disturbing the finish or structure. Cellulose insulation is heavily treated (around 15% by volume) with ammonium sulfate, borax, or boric acid. This treatment helps to make the insulation fire retardant, as well as helps to reduce any pest or mold issues.  There are three types of cellulose insulation:  Loose-Fill Cellulose: The most common type of cellulose insulation is loose-fill cellulose. This type of cellulose insulation is the easiest to install, as it can be blown into attic cavities and floors using the help of a blowing machine.  Dense Pack Cellulose: This is most commonly used for adding retrofit insulation. Dense packing into the wall cavities helps to add thermal insulation, as well as provide some level of soundproofing.  Wet-Applied Spray Cellulose: During the application process, water is added...

What Does Asbestos Insulation Look Like?

Although most homeowners nowadays are aware of asbestos and the dangers associated with it, that was not always the case, especially before the 1980s. If your residential or commercial property was built during the 20th century, you are at a higher risk for asbestos exposure. Keep reading to learn about what asbestos is, the danger it poses, and the different types of insulation that most commonly contain the harmful substance.  What is Asbestos Insulation & is it Dangerous? Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral. The structure of these fibers are extremely effective at slowing the transfer of heat, which is why it was so commonly used as a home insulator; these fibers are also resistant to electricity and corrosion. However, asbestos is a highly toxic material.  If you are exposed to asbestos, it can lead to a multitude of health complications and diseases, including cancer. One of the most common dangers of asbestos exposure is a rare and aggressive form of cancer known as mesothelioma. Other asbestos-related diseases include: Pleural Effusions Pleural Plaques Pleuritis Diffuse Pleural Thickening COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) Lung Cancer Ovarian Cancer Laryngeal Cancer Types of Insulation that Commonly Contains Asbestos 1. Loose-fill Insulation: This type of insulation is most commonly made with asbestos. You can identify this type of insulation by its fluffy consistency and loose, lumpy form.  2. Vermiculite Insulation: This type of insulation is one of the most common household materials containing asbestos. You can identify it by its pebble-like appearance and its grayish-brown or silvery-gold color. 3. Zonolite Insulation: Until 1990, raw vermiculite that was contaminated with asbestos was taken...

Why Is It Important Insulating the Attic?

When it comes to building a new home or renovating your current one, most homeowners are looking for ways to save them money. Luckily, adding insulation to your home is one of the most efficient ways to not only lower your monthly energy bills, but to also make your home more energy efficient. In most cases, the attic is the easiest place to add insulation, making it a great starting place. Keep reading to find out the benefits to insulating your home’s attic.  How Does Insulation Work? Naturally, air flows from warmer areas to cooler ones. During the winter, warm air tries to escape to the cooler air outside, while the hot air makes its way into your cool home during the summer months. Insulation works by limiting air movement throughout the home.  Insulation works by trapping air, preventing the heat from escaping from one place to the next. It is rated in terms of thermal resistance (R-value), which tells you how resistant to heat the insulation is. The higher the R-value is, the better the insulation is at preventing hot air from escaping.  Benefits of Insulating Your Attic  Adding insulation to the attic can make a huge difference in the comfort of your home. Here are some of the top benefits of adding attic insulation. Saves Money on Your Energy Bill   On average, heating and cooling account for 50-70% of the energy used in American homes. When your home is not insulated, you’ll be spending even more money to maintain comfortable temperatures in your home. Proper attic insulation reduces airflow so that you don’t require as much energy...

Could I Soundproof My House By Adding Insulation?

When you’re trying to relax in the comfort of your own home, the last thing that you want to hear is all the noise going on outside. From home construction to cars passing by to busy city streets, today’s houses are noisier than ever! If this is the case for you, you’re probably looking for the best option to soundproof your home. Keep reading to learn more about how insulating your home can help make your home much quieter.  What is Insulation? Insulation is a material used to insulate something, such as a building or a home. Most commonly, insulation works by slowing conductive heat flow and convective heat flow.  Installing the proper home insulation can help to make your home more energy efficient, while also significantly lowering your monthly energy bills.  Can Insulation Reduce Noise in Your Home? To answer your question, yes, insulation can help to reduce noise inside your home. Although installing insulation for soundproofing purposes is beneficial for any home, it is extremely beneficial for those who live in a city or high-traffic areas where noises tend to be a lot louder.  By creating a barrier between the source of noise and adjacent areas and absorbing vibrations, insulation can help to effectively reduce noise in your home. Not all insulation types work for soundproofing. Below you can read more about the best types of insulation for soundproofing your home.  What is the Best Type of Insulation to Soundproof Your Home? If you are looking to use insulation as a way to soundproof your home, fiberglass, cellulose, and spray foam insulation are all great options. Open-cell...