How Does Cellulose Insulation Work?

How Does Cellulose Insulation Work?

If you’re considering boosting your insulation before winter hits, you probably want to know what options you have. There are three primary types of insulation: cellulose, spray foam, and fiberglass. Cellulose is a very popular option for a lot of reasons. It’s environmentally friendly and it’s often the least expensive of the insulation types. This guide can help you decide if cellulose insulation is right for you!   How Cellulose is Installed Cellulose insulation can be installed in three ways. The most common is having it blown into a space using a large hose. This is usually done in the attic, You can also use this insulation in your walls. Dense pack cellulose provides heat and cold insulation, along with a level of soundproofing. Finally, cellulose can be wet sprayed This is generally done during new construction and gives you the same benefits as dense packing the insulation. When installed properly, cellulose will not settle in the building cavity. If someone installs it who aren’t experienced, they may not make it dense enough, which would mean the fill would not work properly. It pays to use a professional!   The R-Value of Cellulose Insulation The R-Value of an insulation product will help you understand how well it does at protecting your home from heat and cold. The R-value of cellulose is between fiberglass and spray foam. It is dense, which gives it a good R-value, reduced air flow, and good soundproofing abilities. Both air flow and R-value make a big difference when it comes to how well your home will be insulated. Cellulose is a great option for high...
Is Cellulose Insulation the Best Choice for Your Home?

Is Cellulose Insulation the Best Choice for Your Home?

There are many different kinds of insulation but today we are going to take a look at some of the benefits of cellulose insulation as compared to fiberglass insulation. Cellulose is rated with a higher R-value than fiberglass is by square inch. Cellulose is plant-based, consisting of plant fibers. This makes it less hazardous than fiberglass and safer for you to install. There are variations of it that give it a soundproofing quality. Advantages of using Cellulose: Made from natural, recycled materials rather than glass particles Possibly the most energy-efficient of all types of blow-in insulation Is very resistant to cold. Resistant to airflow When borate is added it becomes fire retardant Will not corrode steel, copper or aluminum When adding insulation to an attic you have several options including fiberglass batts, blown-in fiberglass, or cellulose. When blowing into a closed wall blown in cellulose is the most cost-effective and practical option. For example, to add rolled fiberglass you would have to pull down the sheetrock walls to add the fiberglass rolls, then reinstall new sheetrock, texture the wall, and paint it. Compare that to making small holes to spray blown cellulose that can be easily patched. Cellulose can technically be created from any plant fibers but usually comes from wood. More specifically paper. Recycled paper products like newspaper, cardboard boxes, and other types of paper products are what is most often used. Because of this cellulose is an eco-friendly product. The most common type of cellulose insulation you will encounter is called loose fill cellulose insulation. It typically will be blown in dry and will be dense and...
What is cellulose insulation?

What is cellulose insulation?

Considering cellulose insulation for your home or place of business? Cellulose insulation is 75% recycled material and 15% boric treatment. It has an R-value of 3.5 per inch of thickness. It is installed with a blower into the attics and walls of a home or business. Because it is blown into place, much like spray foam, it fills small corners and curves in the envelope of your home that fiberglass batts might miss. Ask the team at Reeves Insulation if cellulose insulation is a good choice for your building. Use our online form here: https://www.reevesinsulationllc.com/contact/. Or call us at (870)793-2623. What makes it different from other insulation materials? Cellulose insulation is a great choice for builders looking for an economical, eco-friendly option for insulation. The recycled materials are often paper, sawdust, or plant based materials. With this boric treatment, many materials that would otherwise end up in a landfill, get put back to use as energy-saving insulation. Compared to fiberglass insulation batts, cellulose has a higher, more-efficient R-value. Air has a more difficult time moving through cellulose. Although, it is not as good at air resistance as spray foam insulation. It’s properties, once installed, make it a better air sealant than fiberglass. Is cellulose insulation right for my building? There are a few things to consider before deciding that cellulose insulation is right for your build. Settling: Cellulose is designed to settle. This settling will not cause the R-value to decrease, the insulation will still keep your building at a comfortable temperature like any other insulation material. When it is installed with a blower, the cellulose insulation is damp....
What You Need to Know About Insulation

What You Need to Know About Insulation

While most people don’t give much thought to what’s in their attic or behind their walls, proper insulation is key when it comes to having a comfortable home, lowering energy usage, and preventing moisture problems. The Role of Insulation There are three types of heat flow mechanisms: conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the way heat travels through materials. Convection is the way heat circulates in liquid and gases. And radiation travels in a straight line and heats anything solid in its path. According to the Department of Energy (energy.gov), heat flows from warmer to cooler until there is no longer a temperature difference, regardless of the mechanism. So in the summer, it keeps the warm air outside, and in the winter, it keeps the warm air inside. It does this by trapping pockets of air which slows down the heat flow process. How It’s Rated Insulation is rated by the measurement of resistance the material has to heat transfer, also known as R-value. The higher the R-value the more effective the insulation is. The installation greatly affects the R-value of the material. If installed poorly, this can cut the value substantially. For example, you can install R-30 fiberglass batts but if the batts are not installed perfectly flush with the attic floor, it can cut down to less than half. The reason is because there are gaps between the insulation and the attic floor, which can cause convection heat in those gaps. That heat then turns into radiation heat from the attic floor to inside the home. For more information about R-Value, visit us here. Types of Insulation...